RTW

Week 30 Market Update

GPA EXTENDS TRUCK HOURS AMID GROWING VESSEL BACKLOG

The Port of Savannah has more than 40 vessels anchored outside its harbor, but the Georgia Ports Authority said the  terminal is more fluid today than last fall. 

TERMINAL APPOINTMENTS ADD TO NY-NJ EMPTY RETURN HURDLES

Port of New York and New Jersey drayage carriers say their ability to operate is being hamstrung by the need to find  scarce appointments at marine terminals for returning empties. 

LANDSIDE BOTTLENECKS LIMITING WEST COAST MARINE TERMINAL CAPACITY

West Coast port managers say their terminals could handle even more vessel capacity than trans-Pacific carriers are  scheduled to deploy this peak season, but landside bottlenecks are limiting the effective terminal capacity that exists  today. 

PHILAPORT READIES OCEAN TERMINAL FOR MORE BOXES AS ASIA SERVICE LAUNCHES

The Port of Philadelphia is prioritizing the densification of the Packer Avenue Marine Terminal and looking to open new  near-dock storage as it readies for post-Panamax ship calls. 

GEORGIA, SOUTH CAROLINA PORTS URGE OCEAN CARRIERS TO END SKIPPING CALLS

Officials in Savannah and Charleston want carriers to stop changing port calls because unexpectedly discharging  containers in the other’s port causes landside woes and disrupts the overall supply chain. 

PARTIES IN WEST COAST PORT LABOR NEGOTIATIONS REPORT PROGRESS ON HEALTH BENEFITS

Parties involved in the U.S. West Coast port labour talks have announced a tentative agreement on health benefits as  negotiations on other issues continue in overtime. 

The International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU), representing longshore workers, and employers represented  by the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) issued a joint statement on Tuesday announcing the tentative deal on what  the statement described as “an important part of the contract.” 

The labour contract being negotiated covers more than 22,000 longshore workers at 29 U.S. West Coast ports. The  previous agreement expired on July 1 and negotiations, which kicked off May 10, are continuing without a contract  extension. Both sides have promised to keep cargo moving and maintain normal operations during the negotiations,  recognizing the strategic importance of the ports to the economy. 

Details regarding the tentative agreement related to maintenance of health benefits (MOB) are not being released. In  fact, neither party is releasing any details related to the negotiations with the exception of period joint statements. Uncertainty surrounding the negotiations have contributed to more vessels shifting calls to U.S. East and Gulf Coast  ports, like the ports of New York, Savannah and Houston, where cargo volumes have surged to new records. 

PORT OF SAVANNAH BACKUP SWELLS AS SHIFTING TRADE AND AD HOC SERVICES CONTRIBUTE TO CARGO SURGE

Port of Savannah’s ship backup continues to build as a shift in vessel calls from the West Coast, Charleston diversions,  and growing number of ad hoc and new services led the port to its busiest June on record. 

Georgia Ports Authority (GPA) reported record cargo volumes in June at the Port of Savannah, the second-busiest port  on the East Coast and fastest-growing in the nation. June’s volumes close out Savannah’s fiscal year with 5.76 million  twenty-foot equivalent container units (TEU), up 8 percent compared to FY2021. 

The Port of Savannah experienced a record June, handling 494,107 TEUs, up 10.6 percent or 47,300 TEUs compared to  the same month last year. June’s cargo volumes follow Savannah’s busiest month ever in May and third-busiest month  on record in April.

“As the hub in a global network of road, rail and ocean carrier connections, our ports link Georgia businesses to  international trade lanes and open doors to prosperity for our state and nation,” said Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp. “The  Georgia Ports Authority and its partners in the logistics industry are powerful drivers for local economies across the  Peach State, from small communities to our thriving urban centres.” 

The port authority said that in addition to organic growth, Savannah trade has also been boosted by West Coast labour talks and delayed access to rail at West Coast ports, prompting a significant shift in vessel calls. It is also receiving  container trade diverted from the Port of Charleston. 

SHIP BACKUP

GPA said it is currently handling the highest volume of ad hoc and new service vessels the Port of Savannah has  experienced to date. “Uncertainty around the labour talks, unprecedented and unplanned vessel calls, record cargo  volume, and vessel diversions to Savannah have contributed to a higher-than-normal number of vessels waiting at  anchor,” the GPA said in its update. 

The backup of ships waiting at anchor off Savannah has swelled in recent months, growing from the single digits in May  to 43 currently, surpassing last September’s record number before the GPA took steps to alleviate congestion. By  February the backup was eliminated. 

“Despite the record volumes, the Port of Savannah remains fluid,” said GPA Executive Director Griff Lynch. “Several  factors have contributed to our growing container capacity, including expedited infrastructure projects, our inland pop up yards and an influx of truck drivers moving to the Southeast.” 

GPA is also reporting record truck turns during both its day and night-gate operations. Garden City Terminal saw a  weekday average of 14,500 truck moves in June, counting both inbound and outbound gate exchanges. 

PORT OF OAKLAND TERMINALS REOPENED AS TRUCKERS’ PROTEST MOVED TO NEW SITE

California’s Port of Oakland has fully resumed operations after truckers protesting a gig-work law blocked access for five days and disrupted the flow of  goods at the key shipping hub. Terminals restarted operations over the  weekend and cargo is now moving  normally, the port said in a statement  Monday. Still, it will likely take weeks to  reduce the backlog created by the  protests, said Robert Bernardo, a  spokesman for California’s third-busiest  port. The blockade led the port’s largest  marine terminal, SSA Marine Inc., to shut  down for at least three days last week,  while three others closed for trucks at  different points. About 450 dockworkers  were unable to report to their job. The  disruptions affected the shipping of  goods including medical supplies,  agricultural products, livestock and  industrial parts, the port said. The protests are now being shifted to  “free speech zones,” Bernardo said. The  port’s executive director, Danny Wan,  last week urged drivers to move to those  newly designated areas and to “cease any further protest activity that disrupts port operations.”

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